BANDALOOP, The Village Impacts, and Illuminate present #SFPublicCanvas

BANDALOOP, The Village Impacts, and Illuminate present #SFPublicCanvas

BANDALOOP, The Village Impacts, and Illuminate present #SFPublicCanvas
June 16-19, 2016 @ 9 PM in San Francisco’s 
Tenderloin/Central-Market Neighborhood
Large-scale, multimedia, vertical dance project  fuses art and technology to create public discourse

 

San Francisco, CA (May 4, 2016) ­ #SFPublicCanvas, a large-scale, multi-media, vertical dance performance, premieres June 16-19, 2016 on the exterior of the Hastings School of Law building at the Demonstration Gardens, 333 Golden Gate Avenue. A collaboration between media artist Jonathan Rowe of The Village Impacts, choreographer Amelia Rudolph and her company BANDALOOP, and producing partner Illuminate,#SFPublicCanvas fuses art and technology to create public discourse around the rapidly changing landscape of the Tenderloin/Central-Market neighborhood. It also features special guest performances byCampo Santo, Tassiana Willis, and spoken word artists from Youth Speaks.

Performances begin at 9:00 pm and admission is free and open to the public. A limited number of reserved seats will also be available for $35. The public is encouraged to bring their own chairs or mats.

The brainchild of Rowe and Rudolph, #SFPublicCanvas was the result of a happy accident. Rowe had been pondering creating a large-scale projection and interactive media installation with content aggregated through social media. Rudolph was interested in creating a site-specific project in the Tenderloin that used art and technology to explore the social issues facing the neighborhood and its residents. A mutual friend from Illuminate introduced the two, agreed to be their producing partner, and the project was born.

For #SFPublicCanvas, the collaborators chose to focus on the complex social composition and the challenges faced by the Tenderloin/Central-Market. Along with a strong sense of neighborhood pride, urban blight, poverty, and addiction afflict many of the residents and encourage the divide between a perceived encroachment of “tech outsiders” and long-time residents. A fundamental project aim was to connect a broad range of participants through crowd-sourced content and live performance using technology to create a platform that would engage and include residents, increase pride of place, and foster a community dialog around these issues.

Over several months, stories were collected through a public call to action, crowdsourcing via social media, community workshops held at the Tenderloin Museum, Boedekker Park and Demonstration Gardens, and through meetings with Skywatchers, The Art Don’t Stop, Larkin Street Youth Services, Lines Ballet and ArtSpan. Participants, representing the broad range of ages, ethnicities, and economic status found in the neighborhood, were asked to respond to a variety of questions such as, “what change do you want to see?”, “Who are you?”, “What does home mean to you?” The submissions served as inspiration for Rudolph’s choreography and were used by Rowe and his team to create a large-scale, multi-layered, kaleidoscopic “video canvas” that weaves together the history of the neighborhood, the stories of the people who live and work there, the opportunities and challenges they face, and their hopes and dreams for a brighter future.

To add further depth and energy to the scope of the work, poets and artists from Youth Speaks and Campo Santo, both of whom have deep roots in the neighborhood, will use spoken word to unite the visual and kinetic qualities of the work with Youth Speaks Poet-in-Residence Tassiana Willis working with Rudolph to create a connective through-line. Key words said, seen and sung live by the Youth Speaks poets further link the visual content with the dance. Similarly, the choreography on the wall brings movement to the poetry, with the dancers and poets interacting at key moments to further integrate text and dance with visual imagery. “Pick up the Pieces,” an excerpt from Babylon is Burning, a musical performance piece by Campo Santo, will be featured as a turning point in the work, contributing powerful social commentary through a soulful, elegant musical work.

“We saw this project as a “many-to-many” conversation using various means of storytelling,” said Rowe. “By using art and technology to bring a diverse set of opinions and voices to light, we can show that there are ideas and solutions out there to ultimately give people some hope.

The collaborators plan to tour #PublicCanvas and take the concept to other cities where they will work with partners to localize it and focus on the unique challenges facing each community. They see the project as a gateway and a potential model for other communities to share ideas, create a dialog, and solve problems together. “We hope #SFPublicCanvas will inspire people to use technology to get their voice out there and show how powerful a tool art can be to affect change,” added Rudolph.

#SFPublicCanvas is funded by San Francisco Grants for the Arts/General Fund Portion of the Hotel Tax Fund; The California Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts; The Kenneth Rainin Foundation; the Fleishhacker Foundation and Paragon Real Estate Group.

Press photographs are available at: http://bandaloop.org/high-resolution-photos/

Credits:

Artistic Director Amelia Rudolph
Video Artist Jonathan Rowe and Madrone Studios
featuring
Tassiana Willis and Youth Speaks Poets
with special performance from Campo Santo’s Babylon is Burning
Assistant Artistic Director Melecio Estrella
Lighting by Jim French
Music by Ben Judovalkis, Gideon Freudmann, and Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky

BANDALOOP
A pioneer in vertical dance performance, BANDALOOP seamlessly weaves dynamic physicality, intricate choreography and the art of climbing to turn the dance floor on its side. Founded by choreographer and artistic director Amelia Rudolph, BANDALOOP’s work has been presented in theaters and museums, on skyscrapers, bridges, billboards and historical sites, in atriums and convention halls, in nature on cliffs, and on screen.

THE VILLAGE IMPACTS
As the nonprofit arm of The Village, San Francisco’s state-of-the-art events venue, The Village Impacts’ mission is to empower and support local culture, artists, and public art programs by applying immersive technology and digital art to create inspiring, educational, and entertaining events. With their expertise in the events industry and access to state-of-the-art tools and technology in event production, The Village Impacts brings arts, culture, and technology together to improve San Francisco and build strong communities.

ILLUMINATE
Illuminate is the nonprofit arts organization originally established to help bring The Bay Lights into existence, and the organization has since worked on several large­scale public art installations. Their mission is to produce contemporary art with civic impact, social activation and global reach to stimulate a culture of generosity and collaboration.

YOUTH SPEAKS
Youth Speaks places young people in control of their intellectual and artistic development. They do oral poetry that helps define the new American voice. By creating the link between poetry, spoken word, youth development and civic engagement, Youth Speaks aims to deconstruct dominant narratives in hopes of achieving a more inclusive and active culture.

CAMPO SANTO
Campo Santo is a multicultural new performance group that gives voice to untold stories through socially relevant world premieres of plays created in long-term processes. Under the direction of Co-Founder Sean San Jose, the group created Babylon is Burning, a performance piece combining live music, dance, and theater in collaboration with other artists and performing groups

Amelia Rudolph (Artistic Director/Choreographer) is a choreographer, dancer/athlete, teacher and community leader. Her work is informed by natural and built spaces, human relationships, and by non-traditional relationships with gravity. She founded BANDALOOP in 1991, bringing together dance, climbing and varied off-the-ground movement into site-reactive performances on cliffs, urban structures and in theaters. She is an active and dynamic performer, teaches youth in Oakland through Destiny Art Center and recently served on the board of Dance/USA. In 2015 Amelia completed the NEA funded re-mount of Crossing, filmed in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and made into a short film titled SHIFT which opened the 2016 Sonoma International Film Festival. Rudolph is currently preparing for the launch of her new multi-media urban performance work #SFPublicCanvas in San Francisco’s Tenderloin/Central-Market district and the filming of her next mountain work in Yosemite, Coyote Waltzes. Rudolph and BANDALOOP have recently been designated by the Trisha Brown Company to re-mount and perform Brown’s seminal work Man Walking Down the Side of a Building exclusively throughout the world.

Jonathan Rowe (Video Artist) uses emerging visual and interactive technologies to create memorable experiences for influential events. He combines his visual and artistic creativity with deep knowledge of new and emerging technologies and crowd-sourced content integration to generate multi-media presentations of astonishing quality. Jonathan’s long time belief in the magic of creative expression inspired him to move to San Francisco to found Madrone Studios, a full service creative agency specializing in creating immersive experiences through the marriage of light, visuals, sound, and cutting edge technology. The agency uses new media, video production, immersive projection, and interactive technologies to create memorable experiences.

Tassiana Willis (Spoken Word) is one of the inaugural Emerging Arts Fellows at Youth Speaks, Inc. and is currently serving as their Poet-in-Residence. She is an accomplished writer, actress, and singer and has been a leader in YS programs such as SPOKES Youth Advisory Board, Brave New Voices Team Bay Area, and Future Corp; the engine that runs Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Festival in a rotating US city each year. She has recently been chosen by the Emerging Arts Professionals SF/Bay as one of their Fellows, and has just completed the historic run of Anna Deveare Smith’s Notes from the Field at Berkeley Repertory Theater as a facilitator for their community engagement process that worked with over 12,000 audience members during the 24 show run.

Madrone Studios and The Village Impacts Announce “Farm To Fork SF: The Chefs,” a Media-Driven Pop-Up Dining Experience

Madrone Studios and The Village Impacts Announce “Farm To Fork SF: The Chefs,” a Media-Driven Pop-Up Dining Experience

We’re excited to announce the next incarnation of our Farm To Fork SF event series! We’re working with some of the best chefs in the Bay Area to bring you a one-of-a-kind pop-up dining event series. Read the official press release below and visit www.farmtoforksf.org for more info.


SAN FRANCISCO, April 20, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — The Village Impacts and Madrone Studios build off last year’s Farm To Fork SF expo with a new media-driven pop-up dinner series and accompanying documentary series, Farm To Fork SF: The Chefs. The one-of-a-kind dinner series launches on May 8 at The Village event venue in downtown San Francisco with a meal from renowned Chef Tu David Phu, whose resume includes stints at Berkeley’s Michelin-rated Gather and Chez Panisse. A portion of the profits from the event will be donated to Slide Ranch to support sustainable farming education.

The communal, 40-seat pop-up dinners are designed as “fully connected dining experiences,” utilizing multimedia components to provide guests with a holistic understanding of the elements that went into the making of their meal. Madrone Studios’ production team will create a short film exploring the background of participating chefs as they develop their menu, source ingredients, and create dishes for their pop-up dinner.

At the events, diners will be fully immersed in the chef’s process, as they will have the chance to watch the film on The Village’s 75ft. panoramic projection wall and speak to the chef in person. Working with Madrone Studios’ event production team, each chef will curate a personalized look for their pop-up dinner using The Village’s lighting and projection capabilities.

“As a venue building our catering program, food sustainability, the farm to table movement, and the craft behind it are really important to us,” said Jonathan Rowe, CEO of The Village and Madrone Studios. “Our goal is to give guests an experience that not only educates them about where their food is coming from, but also gives them a personal connection to the passion and creativity of the chefs responsible for their meal. By educating guests and teaming up with Slide Ranch, we’re excited to support food sustainability in a unique way.”

The launch event for Farm To Fork SF: The Chefs on May 8 will feature a locally-sourced Vietnamese seafood menu and wine pairing from Chef Tu David Phu, one of the nation’s top farm to table chefs. The organizers are working with premiere chefs like Spruce’s John Madriaga, Ground Kitchen’s Alejandra Espinoza, and more, with plans to host up to two pop-up dinners each month.

For tickets and more information on Farm To Fork SF: The Chefs, visit www.farmtoforksf.org.

The Future of Live Music, Art & Tech

The Future of Live Music, Art & Tech

As the worlds of art and tech become more and more intertwined every day, one industry where they are virtually inseparable is live music. As fans now have multiple options (legal or otherwise) when it comes to listening to recorded music, they’re spending less on CDs and downloads and more on concert tickets. Over last four years, spending on live music has increased by 66% and it’s expected to make up 70% of total music revenue by 2019.

With numbers like that, musicians, venues, and festival organizers are looking for new ways to create unique experiences to set their events apart. It’s becoming commonplace for concerts and festivals to feature art installations, projection mapping and light shows, new forms of interactivity, or some combination of all of the above.

Lighting

Back in October, 2015, we hosted a sold out performance from electronic artist, Nicolas Jaar at The Village. He and his production team made use of lasers and fog machines to fully envelop the entire venue in a hazy, otherworldly glow, which fit perfectly with the musician’s persona and his brand of dark, experimental electronica.

 

 

Projection Mapping

Nicolas Jaar’s light show, however, is just scratching the surface of the many ways musicians are using technology to enhance their live shows.

Over the last decade or so, projection mapping has been huge in live music, especially EDM. While most artists in this realm started out using simple projection screens, many artists today use large-scale custom fabricated stage structures to display complex 3D projections. The video below shows one of the most impressive examples we’ve seen of projection mapping for a live performance, developed by creative studio, Obscura Digital for the electro/world music fusion band, Beats Antique (both from the Bay Area). With the ability for the musicians to control projection effects on stage, the production seamlessly melds Beats Antique’s music with Obscura’s visual storytelling, creating a unique experience at every show.

 

Interactive Experiences

Artists and musicians are also using technology to create new ways for fans to interact with music. In August, a group of artists, designers, and developers from New Museum’s New Inc incubator in NYC opened a 3-day interactive music installation called DELQA. The project allowed the guests to “get inside the music” of electronic artist, Matthew Dear, using Microsoft Kinect technology. With Dear’s music playing, guest were able to walk through an environment where they could climb on objects and push on mesh walls to manipulate the music.

While this wasn’t a live concert per se, this idea and technology have the potential to be reimagined and reapplied on larger scale for live events.

Fully Immersive Art Installations 

While featuring art installations at music festivals is nothing new, most of the time those installations are designated to a certain area or thought of as an addition to the experience. Day for Night, a new music festival in Houston that debuted in December, 2015, dubbed “a music festival inside an art installation,” flips that idea by fully integrating art into the design of the event. The festival, “specifically designed around the merging of technology and sound and how audiences experience them,” featured 3 stages and 20 immersive and interactive art installations using the latest tech in lighting and sound. By making large-scale art just as much a part of the identity of the festival as the music, Day for Night set itself apart and is likely to grow in the coming years.

Fully integrating immersive art installations with live music is an idea we love… In fact, we’ve got something big in the works right now! Check back soon for more details or subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to hear about it.

LED Art Installation Analyzes the Emotion of the Twittersphere

LED Art Installation Analyzes the Emotion of the Twittersphere

In a recent article by Hank Ostholthoff, CEO of the Chicago-based digital agency, Mabbly, the author states,

“The line between tech and art is irreparably blurred — in fact, in today’s world, they’re inseparable. Tech creates unique avenues for artists to express themselves, providing unprecedented new mediums and tools for broadening the audience with which they can communicate.”

There’s no question that line between tech and art is becoming blurrier every day, and perhaps one of the most overt illustrations of that blurred line is The Fuse Studios’ “Amygdala” installation at the CUBO Centro Unipol in Bologna, Italy.

Amygdala Art Installation

The installation employs a program that analyzes up to 30 tweets per second, categorizing each one as happy, angry, sad, disgusted, amazed, or scared. The project “listens to shared thoughts, interprets states of mind and translates the data gathered into an audiovisual installation capable of representing the collective emotional state of the net and its changes on the basis of events that take place around the world.”

Using “Sentiment Analysis,” the software is able to examine the language used in each tweet and determine its emotional status. That emotional status is then translated into color patterns on LED walls inside the museum and waves of light on 41 LED bars in the Media Garden.
 

 
While “Amygdala” is a visually stunning art installation on the surface, it also creates a visual representation of the more unsettling side of social media and big data, as the discipline of Sentiment Analysis, used to research online behavior to help predict movement in financial markets, forecast elections, manage online reputations, create customized ad campaigns, and more, continues to grow.

Amygdala Art Installation

 

Creative Fuel: Danny Jones

Creative Fuel: Danny Jones

The Bay Area is full of creative professionals working in just about every discipline imaginable. That makes this part of the country a hub of creativity, but also a highly competitive job market for creative professionals. To stay competitive, every creative needs to find fuel and inspiration for their work, which is not always an easy task. So, with that in mind, we bring you our Creative Fuel interview series, as we speak to some of the brightest up and coming Bay Area creatives about how they keep their creativity flowing on a daily basis…   

Danny Jones – 3D Designer 

Danny Jones

What do you use on a daily basis to fuel your creativity?

A steady stream of coffee, music and C4D.

What do you do to get into a creative zone?

I work in high pockets of productivity/creativity. I work hard to not burn the candle for too long. I try to take a break while I’m still hot. I like mixing up my day with calls, designing, learning, playing and exploring. For me, super long back-to-back days of just grinding it out are do-able but I take longer to recover from them.

Popping in and out of my work gives me a chance to look at it fresh multiple times. I get that first-look feeling and being super critical of my own work, that’s really helpful.

Danny Jones

 

How did you decide to pursue a career in a creative field?

I’m not sure it was a conscious decision.

As a kid I was always aware of design, even thought I didn’t know what it was or what it was called. Pouring over album packaging for Ghostface Killah’s IRONMAN album art or analyzing skate deck graphics or Nike shoe designs, I was drawn to it.

I was interning for a guy who wrote online bank software in high school, learning to code. He introduced me to Photoshop and the wormhole to design was opened from there.

It’s worth noting that the concept of a visual language and even Photoshop was explained to me through the eyes of an engineer. I think on some level I’ve always had that engrained in my work–that sort of technical breakdown of things and elements in a very logical way.

Who are some creative professionals that have inspired you?

A lot of things outside of design: ceramicists, rare objects, fashion, music, Japanese oddities, industrial design and VFX artists.

Virgil Abloh, GMUNK, Future, Six & Five Studio, Ash Thorp, Serial Cut, Beetle, Mike Cina, Young Thug, ShawnaX, Sight Unseen, Peter Tarka and Études Studio, I could go on and on.

D

How does living in the Bay Area inspire your work?

I like the pace of the Bay Area–things need to move brutally fast. Fast is good for me because I’m constantly pushing my work and my skill set.

How would you describe your work in one sentence?

V RARE A+++ WOULD BUY AGAIN +1 SHIPPING. I’m joking. Actually I’m the worst at describing my own work. I’m a designer at heart and I create through that lens, whatever the medium or execution.

Dammit I think I completely failed that last one…

Creative Fuel: Aaron Powers

Creative Fuel: Aaron Powers

The Bay Area is full of creative professionals working in just about every discipline imaginable. That makes this part of the country a hub of creativity, but also a highly competitive job market for creative professionals. To stay competitive, every creative needs to find fuel and inspiration for their work, which is not always an easy task. So, with that in mind, we bring you our Creative Fuel interview series, as we speak to some of the brightest up and coming Bay Area creatives about how they keep their creativity flowing on a daily basis…   

 

Aaron Powers – Product Design Student

 

Aaron_Powers_photo

What do you use on a daily basis to fuel your creativity?

Sometimes I browse design blogs during breakfast, however, during my last internship I got into a good habit of reading a book during my commute on the bus and I really enjoyed getting away from staring at a screen all day. The genres of books range from sports biographies to science fiction, I gladly welcome any subject or genre outside of the design world!

Aaron+Powers_Portfolio_test_10_Page_09

What do you do to get into a creative zone?

There’s definitely a free mindset that I have to get into before I’m in my creative zone. If I’m sketching on a project I like to go at it in 90 minute intervals of uninterrupted sketching. Having a clear start and stop time helps me from burning out and staying fresh throughout the day. Before those sessions I’m going through my thoughts and taking notes on what I’m going to be sketching on, what I’m going to try and accomplish and I’m also wiping out any negative thoughts so that my mind is free for the next 90 or so minutes. It’s so easy to start a creative morning and stop 10 minutes in to check emails or do something else, so I really appreciate the clear start and stop moments that I’ve been putting to use!

How did you decide to pursue a career in a creative field?

Most of my childhood and teen years were spent gaming and on the internet and one day I stumbled upon an online gaming forum that had a digital art section. I always enjoyed the idea of art and drawing but I never had the patience growing up to embark on that journey. In high school we had a few assignments along the lines of “What are you going to go to college for?” and I stumbled across Industrial Design and saw this amazing sketches that sparked both my love for art and drawing and my interest in products and problem solving.

Who are some creative professionals that have inspired you?

As far as designers go I have to say that Charles and Ray Eames inspire me to push further than traditional industrial design. They were involved in so many disciplines of design and education and never put themselves in a box, it’s incredible what they were involved with! I’ve also been fortunate to have been mentored by D’wayne Edwards who taught me the value of storytelling and designing for the user.

 

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 preset

How does living in the Bay Area inspire your work?

There’s an energy and community in San Francisco that inspires me to do more and keep learning! I’m truly amazed with the amount of resources and tools I’m surrounded by, almost anything I want to learn or experience is a few miles away or at an event in the near future.

How would you describe your work in one sentence?

My work is fueled by my passion for humanity and an inner curiosity about the world and how we live in it.

Creative Fuel: Madeline Moore & Stuart Wade

Creative Fuel: Madeline Moore & Stuart Wade

The Bay Area is full of creative professionals working in just about every discipline imaginable. That makes this part of the country a hub of creativity, but also a highly competitive job market for creative professionals. To stay competitive, every creative needs to find fuel and inspiration for their work, which is not always an easy task. So, with that in mind, we bring you the first post in our Creative Fuel interview series, as we speak to some of the brightest up and coming Bay Area creatives about how they keep their creativity flowing on a daily basis.    

Madeline Moore – Stylist/Artist/Set Designer

Madeline Berry Moore

 

What do you use on a daily basis to fuel your creativity?

I move around. A lot. In an effort to constantly refresh my perspective, I walk, dance and travel on a more-than-regular basis.

Madeline Berry MooreMadeline Berry Moore

What do you do to get into a creative zone?

Shucks, I  was born in a creative zone . . I struggle to differentiate between my life and my art; therefore, every moment, every action, every meal, every exchange of words, every environment is an opportunity to create something new driven by emotions or aesthetics. Sometimes I think life would be easier if I could step out of the creative zone.

 

How did you decide to pursue a career in a creative field?

I don’t think I ever made a conscious decision to pursue a career in the arts, rather, I can’t fathom another way of life. Born into an artistic family from Mississippi, there has always been an emphasis on squeezing at least one drop of artistic merit from any given situation.

 

Who are some creative professionals that have inspired you?

Branden Collins

Larissa Hadjio

Nobel Truong

 

How would you describe your work in one sentence?

With my work, I explore the seasons of life, attempting to identify that which is hard for most to see: the beauty that falls dormant during winter, and the grotesque that percolates the bulbs of spring.  

 

Stuart Wade – 3D Artist/Creative Director

Stuart Wade

What do you use on a daily basis to fuel your creativity?

Sketching and doodling, of course, but I also draw inspiration from the people around me, taking long hikes through nature, music, humor, and the endless pool of amazing artistic talent on the web.

Stuart Wade

What do you do to get into a creative zone?

It usually involves a few cups of coffee and some music or podcasts. At times, I hit the studio totally inspired and ready to work on a bunch of ideas that are exciting at the moment. Other days I show up totally uninspired, and just have to sit down and bash through some work to meet deadlines. Either way it’s about showing up and putting your best work out there.

How did you decide to pursue a career in a creative field?

I come from a creative family. My mother is a fine artist and my father is a musician with a theater background. Some of my earliest memories are wrapping my grubby fingers around crayons. It was a revelation to learn that I could study art, illustration and design in college, and make a career doing what I was passionate about.

 

Who are some creative professionals that have inspired you?

Too many to list, really… Some of my favorite artists in the world right now are AJ Fosik, Aryz, Ferris Plock, Raymond Lemstra and Julian Glander.

 

How does living in San Francisco inspired your work?

It’s an amazing area with unparalleled artistic, cultural and technological opportunities. Not to mention you can drive half an hour outside of the city and be subjected to the sweeping natural beauty of the bay area.

 

How would you describe your work in one sentence?

Simple shapes, bright colors, funky motion.

Announcing #SFPublicCanvas: Fusing Art, Tech & Public Discourse

Announcing #SFPublicCanvas: Fusing Art, Tech & Public Discourse

We’re very excited to start 2016 off with the announcement of #SFPublicCanvas, a new collaborative public art project. We’ve partnered with BANDALOOPIlluminateMadrone Studios, and world-renowned artist, GMUNK on a project featuring vertical dance, projection mapping, and crowdsourced content from YOU! 

The project puts a unique spin on the public discourse surrounding the changing face of San Francisco through the lens of art and technology. It’s a large undertaking, but with your help, we’ll make #SFPublicCanvas a visually stunning and thought provoking performance event.

Throughout the next several months, we’ll be accepting online art submissions in response to the question, “How can we build a future for the Mid-Market/Tenderloin neighborhood that addresses the issues facing the area today?” Those submissions will be compiled into a work of video projection art, which will be displayed in June, 2016 on the outside of the UC Hastings building on Golden Gate Ave, providing an environment for BANDALOOP’s vertical dancers.

The Mid-Market/Tenderloin neighborhood resides at the center of the cultural and financial shifts taking place in San Francisco, which is mirrored in many other cities across the world, and there are varied opinions regarding how we can progress while still holding onto the cultural fabric that makes our city unique. #SFPublicCanvas provides a means for the community to share their stories, ideas, and hopes for the future in a creative way, both online and within the final performance event.

We encourage participants of all artistic skill levels to contribute to this discussion. Send us your poems, short stories, videos, songs, paintings, digital art, or anything else that inspires you. We’ll award cash prizes to finalists in three categories and all submissions will be considered for collaboration.

You can read the announcement press release below and visit www.sfpubliccanvas.org for more details.

#SFPUBLICCANVAS MULTIMEDIA PERFORMANCE PROJECT FUSES ART, TECHNOLOGY & PUBLIC DISCOURSE

 

San Francisco, CA (January 7, 2016)BANDALOOP, Illuminate, Madrone Studios, and The Village Impacts are proud to announce a new collaborative public art project, #SFPublicCanvas. #SFPublicCanvas is a “many to many” conversation based in art and technology, creating a local “canvas” for performance and storytelling, exposing narratives from San Francisco’s Mid-Market/Tenderloin neighborhood. The project is designed to further the public discourse regarding the changing face of this historic area and the city at large, while shedding light on how similar stories are shared by cities around the world. Over the course of the next several months, artwork submitted by the public will be compiled into a performance work, which will feature projection mapping and BANDALOOP’s internationally acclaimed vertical dance. Performances will take place June 16-19, 2016 on the exterior of Hastings College of the Law on Golden Gate Ave.

 

To create this “canvas,” project organizers have just launched the #SFPublicCanvas Art Competition, asking the public to submit artwork and ideas in response to the question, “How can we build a future for the Mid-Market/Tenderloin neighborhood that addresses the issues facing the area today?” The submissions will be compiled into a cohesive work of video projection art featuring original animation conceived by world-renowned, San Francisco-based designer, GMUNK. During the June performances, the projection art will be displayed as an environment for BANDALOOP’s vertical dance, with aspects of the animation triggering, and being triggered by the performers.  

 

Organizers are calling for artwork in any medium to be submitted via email or Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter using the hashtag, #SFPublicCanvas. After the February 29 deadline, a jury will award finalists in three categories cash prizes and the opportunity to display their work at a one-night Finalist Exhibition gallery event at The Village events venue. A bonus award will also be given to a People’s Choice winner, selected through a public online vote.

 

“This project is a way for us to fuse art, technology, and public discourse,” said Jonathan Rowe, Founder of Madrone Studios. “We’re using art to bring a diverse set of opinions and voices to light, and we want to show that there are ideas and solutions out there to ultimately give people some hope.”  

 

Amelia Rudolph, BANDALOOP’s Artistic Director added, “My hope for this project is to share our artistic energy with a large and diverse audience and create an opportunity for anyone interested in, or affected by technology and the tech industry to take advantage of this project’s ability to express, share, and enlarge their voice by submitted images and stories.”

 

#SFPublicCanvas is funded through generous grants from the Kenneth Rainin Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fleishhacker Foundation, the California Arts Council, and San Francisco Grants for the Arts/General Fund Portion of the San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund.

 

For more information and official submission guidelines, visit www.sfpubliccanvas.org.

 

Get in touch: sfpubliccanvas@gmail.com

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ABOUT BANDALOOP

 

A pioneer in vertical dance performance, BANDALOOP seamlessly weaves dynamic physicality, intricate choreography and the art of climbing to turn the dance floor on its side. Founded by choreographer and artistic director Amelia Rudolph, BANDALOOP’s work has been presented in theaters and museums, on skyscrapers, bridges, billboards and historical sites, in atriums and convention halls, in nature on cliffs, and on screen. bandaloop.org @bandalooping.

 

ABOUT ILLUMINATE

 

Illuminate is the nonprofit arts organization originally established to help bring The Bay Lights into existence, and the organization has since worked on several large-scale public art installations. Their mission is to produce contemporary art with civic impact, social activation and global reach to stimulate a culture of generosity and collaboration.  

 

ABOUT MADRONE STUDIOS

 

Madrone Studios is a full-service creative agency specializing in creating immersive experiences through the marriage of light, visuals, sound, and cutting-edge technology. The agency uses new media, video production, immersive projection, and interactive technologies to create memorable experiences.

 

ABOUT THE VILLAGE IMPACTS

 

As the nonprofit arm of The Village, San Francisco’s state-of-the-art events venue, The Village Impacts’ mission is to nurture the growth and empowerment of creative culture, communities, and collaborations with the common goal of creating a socially responsible world. The Village Impacts partners with like-minded nonprofits and other organizations, utilizing The Village to host innovative events, workshops and seminars in order to raise funds and foster collaboration between the Bay Area’s tech, arts, and science communities.

Creating The Bay Lights: A Presentation from Ben Davis

Creating The Bay Lights: A Presentation from Ben Davis

On November 15, 2015, we teamed up with Illuminate to host our first Arts and Innovation Brunch, where Ben Davis, the Chief Visionary behind The Bay Lights, delivered a powerful and inspiring presentation. He spoke about what it took to create the largest light sculpture in the world, his upcoming projects, and how we can take the bureaucratic lessons he learned to tackle larger issues like climate change.

Thanks to Ben Davis and the incredible team behind the project, the world will get to enjoy The Bay Lights for at least another 10 years, but just a few years ago, it was nothing more than a seemingly impossible idea in Ben Davis’ head. Through countless hours of planning and presenting his idea to city officials, Davis and his team at Illuminate found a way to get those officials to “say yes in a system designed to say no.” By “deconstructing and reconstructing permissions,” Davis led the execution of one of the largest and most ambitious public art initiatives in history, which has taken on a life of its own, inspiring people around the globe.

If you’re in San Francisco, don’t miss the re-lighting ceremony on January 30 at 7:25pm!

Watch Ben Davis’ inspiring presentation here…